Question about using filters with Voyager in an Array

I am new to Voyager’s array capabilities and I’m just starting to research how it works and how to make it run properly. I bought two new 61mm scopes and a “side by side” setup just for this project, obviously there will be more to acquire.

It seems to me that running an array requires that each camera have a full set of filters. I was hoping to split the filters between the cameras so that camera1 could shoot with an Ha and at the same time camera2 could be shooting with an OIII, for example. But the way that voyager focuses the second camera is through offsets, it doesn’t actually go through a focusing routine, so now I’m not so sure if I can have two different filter on the two cameras at the same time.

My purpose of wanting to shoot with two different filter is purely to save costs, as you know, a good set of filters are not what one would call inexpensive.

So my question is simple. Can Voyager focus camera1 with an Ha filter (for example) and then use the offset data to focus camera2 which would be using a different filter?

I am just starting out on this adventure of using arrays and I have a lot to learn so please have patience. But if all works out well I will be setting up more arrays, for me the advantages are to numerable to ignored.

Miguel :sunglasses:

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I’m sure Leo will correct me if I’m wrong but the way I remember it is that each camera in the array will carry out its own focusing routine. So the focus result from camera1 will not affect the focus result from camera2.

For each camera you have to define one filter that will always be used for the focus run, all other filters in that camera will be set via the offset values.

So I think the trick is to have a broadband filter in each filter wheel which will be used for focusing, as this will be much quicker than doing a focus run with a narrowband filter. So for example if you have a full set of LRGB and Ha/OIII/NII you could split them:

  • Camera1: L / Ha
  • Camera2: R / G / B / OIII / NII

Then choose L as the focus filter for camera1 and R as the focus filter for camera2 (and you will have to work out all the offsets from those filters to the other filters in that camera of course).

Hope this is correct and makes sense!

Mike

1 Like

Mike you have explained right, thank you so much.

I just want to add … if you want to do only narrow all things work, you can have HA filter only on one node and OIII filter only on the other. In this case if you use focus on single star what will be slow is only the pointing with solving on the master because you must necessary use the HA (or OIII) for plate solving … basically you must go by binning and longer the plate solving exposure.

Another way is to have L,HA on first node and only OIII on the second … you can choose HA and OIII like base filter for focus if you use single star focus. L will used only in master which is the only node doing plate/blind solving tasks.

If you use localfield you can choose different kind of filter between nodes narrow in one and broad in another one … but with narrow localfield (or focus on all field) will need more time to running …

So if you want more opinion or have more questions just ask

All the best
Leonardo

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Thank you Mike and Leonardo for the replies and for clarifying the method that Voyager uses to focus for different filters. Knowing this information will certainly help me get my array up and running sooner. Less money spent on filters for this array means that my second array will happen that much sooner.

Now to determine how I want to setup my filters.

Thanks Again,
Miguel :sunglasses:

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You are welcome Miguel

All the best
Leonardo